The Village of Pittsford Walking Tour


1. Walking Tour Parking
The parking lot on N. Main Street and Monroe Ave

Latitude: 43.091465
Longitude: -77.515492

Please park in this location (Burdette Lot) to start your tour or you may park at the Village Hall at 21 N. Main Street.


2. The Little House
18 Monroe Avenue

Latitude: 43.091312
Longitude: -77.516426

The Little House

The Little House

This small Federal style temple-front building was constructed in 1819 as an attorney's office. During the first decades of the nineteenth century, Pittsford was the primary government and business center for eastern Monroe County. Buildings of this type, use, and size were common in the more established settlements of Western New York during the period. Over the years, this building has functioned as a doctor's office, library, bakery, nursery school, and a travel agency. In 1965, to save the building from demolition, Historic Pittsford moved it across the street, restored it to its original appearance, and opened it to the public as a museum.


3. Potter-Steele-Bolger House
20 Monroe Avenue

Latitude: 43.091457
Longitude: -77.51679

This multi-level house is one of the villages oldest and architecturally unique buildings. The rear 2-story Federal style portion of the house was built in 1815. The front wing 1-story wing featuring twin porches, double entrances and a ballroom was added several decades after the original house was constructed. The wing exhibits exceptional late-Federal period detailing. For most of its history the house remained in the possession of the Potter/Steele family. Fletcher Steele who grew up and retired here became one of the nation’s most prominent landscape architects during the first half of the twentieth century.


4. Killip/Davis House
21 Monroe Avenue

Latitude: 43.091129
Longitude: -77.516966

This fine 2-1/2-story Queen Anne house was built about 1900 By Ellsworth and Joyce Killip. Distinctive features include the complex massing, gable bays, a cross plan and a finely detailed wrap-around porch. The recessed barrel-vault balcony at the front gable is a Shingle Style feature. Between 1908 and 1970, the house was home to Dr. Arthur Davis, a radiologist.


5. Geare/Schoen/Richardson House
25 Monroe Avenue

Latitude: 43.091404
Longitude: -77.517434

This 2-1/2-story Queen Anne house was built 1885 by Charles Spellman, a well- known Pittsford builder. The house features steeply pitched roofs, asymmetrical complex massing, decoratively cut clapboard detailing at the gables, Stick Style trim work, gable bays and stepping stained glass windows at the stair. The house is one of a group of Queen Anne village homes that share distinctive decorative elements.


6. Sylvanus Lathrop House
28 Monroe Avenue

Latitude: 43.091694
Longitude: -77.517448

This elegant 2½-story brick Federal style house was constructed in 1826 by early Pittsford entrepreneur, Sylvanus Lathrop. Distinctive elements of the house include elliptical gable end fan lights, carved stone lintels, and a highly detailed Federal style entrance with Ionic order entrance porch. Lathrop made a fortune as the general contractor responsible for construction of the local section of the Erie Canal. Several years after construction of the canal was completed, Lathrop moved further west to Ohio. The ample size, refined proportions, and sophisticated architectural detailing of this house are evidence of the prosperity brought to Pittsford by the opening of the Erie Canal. As a result of the economic boom brought by the canal, the village has been left with a legacy of many Federal style structures. Lathrop made a fortune as the general contractor responsible for construction of the local section of the Erie Canal. Several years after construction of the canal was completed, Lathrop moved further west to Ohio. The ample size, refined proportions, and sophisticated architectural detailing of this house are evidence of the prosperity brought to Pittsford by the opening of the Erie Canal. As a result of the economic boom brought by the canal, the village has been left with a legacy of many Federal style structures.


7. Ira Buck House
31 Monroe Avenue

Latitude: 43.091678
Longitude: -77.517928

The Ira Buck House

The Ira Buck House

Constructed in 1830, this 2½-story side-gable Federal style house is distinguished by refined proportions, elliptical gable fanlights, four prominent chimneys and a Federal entrance surround with leaded sidelights and transom. The porch, side wing and extended eaves are mid-nineteenth-century alterations. This house is one of a group of four very similar Federal houses in the village. The house was built for Ira Buck who purchased the property from Glover Perrin. Buck was a prominent village merchant who ran a general store on South Main Street.


8. Dr.Hartwell Carver House
41 Monroe Avenue

Latitude: 43.091841
Longitude: -77.518389

This cross-gable 2½-story house is a distinguished example of the Gothic Revival style. Built of brick the exterior of the house has been overlaid with board-and-batten siding. The steeply pitched raking eaves are embellished with curvilinear barge boards. Pointed-arch windows occur at the gable ends. The house is painted in a historically appropriate color scheme which reflects the view of Romantic period theorist Andrew Jackson Downing that buildings should harmonize with the landscape. The house was enlarged by additions added during the early twentieth century. The house was built for Dr. Hartwell Carver, a local physician who gained national stature for his efforts in promoting the construction of a transcontinental American railroad.


9. Sutherland House
42 Monroe Ave

Latitude: 43.092186
Longitude: -77.518837

This 2½-story front-gable house is another early village home, which until the early twentieth century, was occupied by the Isaac Sutherland family. Sutherland owned extensive farmlands including an orchard. The Sutherland farm occupied what is now the western portion of the village. The house retains Federal Style proportions, massing, and fenestration. About 1920 the house was enlarged and remodeled in the Colonial Revival style. Changes included stucco cladding, the large front bay window, the side wing, and the new entrance vestibule. The changes made to the house illustrate the effect on the village made by wealthy Rochester commuters who began moving here after 1900.


10. Sutherland/Richbein House
55 Monroe Avenue

Latitude: 43.092162
Longitude: -77.520025

This ca. 1890, 2-1/2-story, cross-plan Queen Anne “Gomph” house was built as a tenant house for the Isaac Sutherland family farm. Sutherland owned extensive farmlands including an orchard. The Sutherland farm occupied what is now the western portion of the village including the site of Sutherland High School. The house features characteristic decoratively cut clapboard at the gables and an elaborate wrap-around porch with turned posts, spindle frieze, and entry pediment.


11. Sutherland Street
5 Sutherland Street

Latitude: 43.091852
Longitude: -77.520089

The lower (north) block of Sutherland Street is a well preserved early twentieth century neighborhood with a complete collection of period styles including Colonial Revival, Four Square, and Craftsman homes. The wide median between curb and sidewalk is planted with a mature canopy of maple trees. Although the houses vary in size and detail, the consistent setback and ever-present front porches unify the streetscape.

The upper block of Sutherland Street contains an assortment of Colonial Revival and Tudor homes dating from the first half of the twentieth century.


12. Pittsford School (Lincoln Avenue School)
35 Lincoln Avenue

Latitude: 43.090251
Longitude: -77.519575

This 3-story brick structure was constructed in 1916 after a fire destroyed an earlier building. Originally the building housed grades 1- 12 and accommodated 373 students and 14 teachers. Architecturally the building is a sophisticated but restrained example of Collegiate Gothic. Gothic features include the grouped tall narrow windows divided by projecting mullions, the end pavilion massing, and the parapeted entrance pavilion with monumental segmental-arch transom window and buttresses's.

This building housed all Pittsford school grades until Sutherland High School was built in 1953. The building then functioned as an elementary school until the school district over built its capacity and abandoned the building in 1971. The building was then sold to the Town of Pittsford for $1 and now houses the Town’s Department of Parks and Recreation.


13. St. Pauls's Lutheran Church
28 Lincoln Avenue

Latitude: 43.090121
Longitude: -77.518204

This church was built in 1884 for the primarily German immigrant Lutheran congregation. Prior to this location, the church occupied what is now a house on Golf Avenue. The church was forced to move because the noise from the newly opened New York West Shore & Buffalo Railroad disturbed the horses in the sheds behind the church.

The church is designed in simple vernacular interpretation of Gothic Revival with Shingle Style detailing at the belfry of the center tower. Uniformly-spaced pointed-arch windows line each side of the sanctuary. The current entrance and community hall were added to the church in 1917.


14. Lincoln Avenue / Washington Avenue streetscape
Lincoln Avenue and Washington Avenue

Latitude: 43.090078
Longitude: -77.517949

The streetscape

The streetscape

These two streets were both developed in the third quarter of the nineteenth century. The appearance of the neighborhood is little changed from a century ago. The neighborhood consists of narrow deep lots with 2½-story wood frame houses, most with porches, set close to the street. The well- preserved architecture in concert with numerous shade trees make this one of the village’s most appealing neighborhoods.


15. John Brown House
45 South Main Street

Latitude: 43.087829
Longitude: -77.516613

This Federal style home was built in 1830. During the mid nineteenth century, it was the home of prominent local business man John Brown. In the 1860s, Brown moved a neighboring house to form the side wing and began developing a new residential street called Morningside Park, now known as Lincoln Avenue. Early in the twentieth century, the house was operated as a bed and breakfast called “Lily Lawn.” Over the last one hundred years, the house has been home to members of the Canfield/Corby family.


16. Reynold-Rand Home
53 & 55 South Main Street

Latitude: 43.088721
Longitude: -77.516833

This fine 2½-story structure was originally constructed in 1833 as a 1½-story cobblestone Greek Revival house by Dr. Rufus Reynolds. The house has remained in the possession of the same family since the time of its construction. During its life the house has undergone three significant alterations. The last and most significant change was the addition of a shingle-clad Craftsman style second floor in 1909. The present Greek Revival entrance surround is original but has been relocated from the projecting front wing.


17. Vought House
57 South Main Street

Latitude: 43.088472
Longitude: -77.517024

This 2½-story stucco clad house was built about 1820 probably in the Federal Style. About 1870, the house was remodeled in the Italianate style and the north wing, with a 2-story bay was added. Finally, about 1925, the current appearance of the house was established with the addition of the south wing, a Palladian window at the gable, a new entrance surround with sidelights, and stucco cladding. For many years the house was owned by members of the Vought family who owned the flour mill on the canal.


18. Augustus Elliot House
62 South Main Street

Latitude: 43.087829
Longitude: -77.516919

This brick Federal structure is one of Western New York's most important Federal style houses. Augustus Elliot, a distiller and land speculator, built the house in 1810. About 1860, the house was sold to the Hargous family from New York City who used it as a summer country estate. During the nineteenth century, the house included extensive grounds including boxwood gardens. The house remained in private ownership until about 1950 when it was purchased by Saint Louis Church.


19. Gaskin/Brizee House
81 South Main Street

Latitude: 43.086434
Longitude: -77.518614

This home was built in 1872 in the Italianate style but remodeled to its present appearance around 1910. A large carriage barn is located behind the house.


20. Hopson/Parker House
99 South Main Street

Latitude: 43.085292
Longitude: -77.519236

Need description of this location.


21. Hargous House
52-54 South Main Street

Latitude: 43.08856
Longitude: -77.516656

One of Pittsford's most important historical examples of architectural quality. Of the Federal Period, it was built in 1810 by Augustus elliot of bricks from the Elihu doud brickyard in Lusk's Hollow. Interior wood trim brought from Albany. Note the "Troy Gable" and the handsome door. A large home for its time and place, it is now the Saint Louis Church Manse.


22. Vought-Allen House
44 South Main Street

Latitude: 43.088913
Longitude: -77.516428

Built in about 1887 by Grandin T, Vought, this house was owned for most of the twentieth century by Dr. Lloyd Allen, a family physician and prominent community figure. This hip-roof 2-1/2- story Queen Anne house features multiple bays and an elaborate wraparound porch with comer turret, spindle frieze, brackets and turned posts. This house is the most elaborate of group of village houses constructed during the 1880's which share similar gable end detailing and were probably the work of a single builder. The former carriage barn facing Locust Street was remodeled into a separate residence early in the twentieth century.


23. Christ Episcopal Church
36 South Main Street

Latitude: 43.089349
Longitude: -77.516131

This fine Gothic Revival church, built in 1868, was designed by well-known Rochester architect A. J. Warner. Constructed of Medina sandstone, the church features a massive centered square tower with clock and slate-clad spire. Contrasting light stone is used to accentuate the buttresses and pointed-arches. In 1968 the church was enlarged in a compatible architectural style. Stone used in the addition was salvaged from a demolished building on the old University of Rochester campus.


24. Hicks and McCarthy Building
23 South Main Street

Latitude: 43.089957
Longitude: -77.515726

Built about 1845, this building was the original home of Christ Episcopal Church. The existing building, with its bracketed cornice and large storefront windows is a good example of late-nineteenth-century commercial architecture. The current restaurant business was established in 1912 as a family-run ice cream shop and soda fountain.


25. Newcomb House
25 South Main Street

Latitude: 43.090039
Longitude: -77.515938

Constructed in 1830, this 2½-story brick side-gable Federal style house is distinguished by refined proportions, elliptical gable fanlights, four prominent chimneys and a Federal entrance surround with leaded sidelights and transom. This house is one of a group of four very similar Federal houses in the village. For many years, the house was the home of the Newcomb family which operated a funeral business. The rear wing, porte-cochere, and 2-story bay are circa 1900 additions.


26. South Main Street Business District
South Main Street

Latitude: 43.089400
Longitude: -77.516250

Pittsford's central business district retains an exceptional number of nineteenth-century commercial buildings, a grouping duplicated nowhere else in the area. Because of the frequent changes that accompany retail commercial use, historic business districts like this have become rare.


27. Murray Building
15 South Main Street

Latitude: 43.090448
Longitude: -77.515688

This circa 1830 2½-story Federal style commercial building is enhanced by an unusual triangular gable-relief and a recessed arched arcade at the main level. About 1860 the roof eaves were extended and the lower cornice of the original pediment was removed. The storefront windows are early twentieth century alterations. For many years this building contained one of the village’s six taverns which was known as the "Hole in the Wall."


28. The Town Hall
11 South Main Street

Latitude: 43.090574
Longitude: -77.515616

This exceptional front-gable 2½-story Queen Anne style civic building was constructed in 1890. At a town meeting citizens voted 323 to 90 to raise $7000 for purchasing a site and erecting a building. The Town Hall’s exuberant facade features a mix of materials including brick, terra cotta, Medina sandstone and slate. Features include a main-level recessed arcade, corbeling, corner blind turrets, and a segmental pediment window at the gable. The building originally continued a large auditorium which was used for movies, shows and other community events.


29. Parker Block
ADDRESS

Latitude: 43.090744
Longitude: -77.515522

This rare surviving early nineteenth century commercial building was constructed by Leonard Clapp and Sylvanus Lathrop in 1826. The south half of the building is believed have been built several years later than the north half. Built in the federal style, the Parker Block, like many early Pittsford buildings, had its eaves extended in the mid nineteenth century. Over the years the building has housed a general store, barber shop, tin shop, furnace store, bakery, Post Office, second-hand furniture store, telephone offices, the American Legion, and Town Court.


30. District Number 6 School
17 Church Street

Latitude: 43.089788
Longitude: -77.51505

This 2½-story front-gable cobblestone school was built in 1842. The building was built by Pittsford mason Samuel Crump. The building served as the village school until 1894 when a larger building was built on Lincoln Avenue. Since that time the building has served as a Masonic Temple. Built in the Greek Revival Style the building features limestone watertable, quoins, sills and lintels. The gables have cornice returns.


31. Guetersloh House
21 Church Street

Latitude: 43.089657
Longitude: -77.514524

Constructed in 1816 by Pittsford’s first doctor, John Ray, this 2½-story side-gable Federal style house is distinguished by refined proportions, cut-stone lintels, elliptical gable fanlights, four prominent chimneys and a Federal entrance surround with sidelights and transom. The Italianate porch, side wing and extended eaves are mid-nineteenth-century alterations. This house is one of a group of four very similar Federal houses in the village.


32. First Presbyterian Church of Pittsford
25 Church Street

Latitude: 43.089467
Longitude: -77.51417

The present Italianate style church was constructed in 1862. The top of the corner slate- clad spire is 130 feet above the ground. The low-slope roof, broad projecting eaves, and half-round windows are all typical Italianate features. The church was expanded several times during the twentieth century and restored after a fire in 2004 gutted the sanctuary.


33. McAlpin/Bonhurst House
35 Church Street

Latitude: 43.088824
Longitude: -77.513705

This ca. 1858 fine Italianate house incorporates and older rear wing. The house exhibits the common characteristics of the regional vernacular interpretation of the Italianate style including broad overhanging eaves, tall narrow windows, bracketed porches and double entrance doors. The interior retains a fine Renaissance Revival stair and marble fireplace mantels. Converted into a double, the house follows a recent village trend of converting doubles back into single family residences.


34. Stoll House
35 State Street

Latitude: 43.089976
Longitude: -77.512915

This small brick house was built about 1850 and used simultaneously for five purposes: grocery store; cooper’s shop; jail (in the cellar) ; local poorhouse, where the owner offered meals for 25 cents which he charged to the county; and family residence. Mr. Stoll was also the village constable. The rear wing and dormers are circa 1910 additions.


35. Stone Plumb-Newcomb House
38 State Street

Latitude: 43.089930
Longitude: -77.512560

The first structure erected in Pittsford Village was a log cabin constructed on this site by Israel Stone in 1789. The present house is believed to be a replacement of the original cabin but the exact date of construction is not known. This two and one-half story gabled wood frame house is one of the oldest surviving structures in the village. The general proportions of the house’s main block, the 12 over 12 double hung sash, the plan configuration, timber frame construction, low ceiling heights and large cellar cooking fireplace all suggest the house was constructed during the first quarter of the nineteenth century. The heavy Greek Revival detailing found at the porch and main cornice is the result of an 1840's remodeling. In 1845 the house was purchased and remodeled by Thomas Plumb, an English immigrant and successful farmer. The Plumb farm extended from this house to include most of the east end of what is now Schoen Place as well as about fifty acres of what today is the Powers Farm. The relocation of the Erie Canal through the village in the 1850's separated the house from the farmlands. Plumb established extensive gardens on the property which were destroyed by the 1910-1912 canal enlargement project.


36. Boughton Avenue Neighborhood
Neighborhood

Latitude: 43.085925
Longitude: -77.51004

This historic neighborhood consists of modest vernacular two-story single family wood frame houses dating from the mid-nineteenth-century to the first two decades of the twentieth century. The Italianate, Queen Anne, Colonial Revival and Four-Square styles are all well represented in the area. The original route of the Erie Canal ran between South Street and what is now Boughton Avenue. The route is still visible today in the form of a depression in the back yards of houses in the area. After the canal was rerouted in 1850s, this area was sold off for lots. Like many communities along the canal, Pittsford experienced a wave of Irish immigrants during the middle of the nineteenth century. Many Irish canal workers settled in this area, earning the neighborhood the nickname of "Little Dublin." The growing Irish community led to the establishment of Saint Louis Roman Catholic Church. The parish was originally housed in a church on State Street. Through the first half of the twentieth century this neighborhood remained a working class area. Over the last thirty years, new residents have renovated most of the homes in the area making the Boughton Avenue area one of the Village's most attractive neighborhoods.


37. Gillam House
23 State Street

Latitude: 43.090166
Longitude: -77.513521

The appearance of this circa 1830 1-1/2- story front-gable Federal style house is typical of the scale and appearance of village houses constructed during the period. The exterior of the house was restored in 1978 when it was converted to retail use.


38. Smith House (Canandaigua National Bank)
18 State Street

Latitude: 43.090564
Longitude: -77.514114

This front gable-front Federal brick house was remodeled later in the nineteenth century by the addition of a Greek Revival porch, extension of the eaves, lengthening of the first floor windows, and a large frame addition at the rear of the house. The building was restored when it was renovated for use as a bank in 1980.


39. Thirsty's Tavern
8 State Street

Latitude: 43.090281
Longitude: -77.514853

The two-story brick gabled Thirsty's building dates from the first half of the nineteenth-century. Although altered with an early twentieth-century storefront addition, this structure retains an elliptical gable window and original proportions at the second floor and eaves. This structure was built as a house and originally had an appearance similar to the Canandaigua National Bank building, located a few doors down the street.

For many years Pittsford was known as the town with six churches and six saloons. Like many rural canal communities, Pittsford was far less gentile then today's observer might suspect. Street brawls were not uncommon, particularly between crews of different canal boats. As Pittsford has grown to become a suburban residential community, most of the bars have disappeared. Of Pittsford's historic tavern locations, only the present site of Thirsty's remains a bar today.


40. Thornell Garage (Starbucks)
5 State Street

Latitude: 43.09025
Longitude: -77.514886

This 2-story rock-face concrete block building was built in 1915 as an automobile service garage. The building replaced an earlier carriage barn that had burned. Although not as architecturally distinguished as some neighboring structures, the building represents a distinctive period in vernacular American construction.


41. The Phoenix Hotel
4 South Main Street

Latitude: 43.090578
Longitude: -77.515299

This three-story step-gable brick hotel is one of Western New York’s most important remaining works of Federal architecture. This well proportioned building features regularly spaced six- over-six windows with cut stone lintels and sills. A recessed arcade of elliptical arches frames the windows and doors at the first floor. A half- round fanlight is located at the gable end. The Federal style entrance with leaded transom and side lights is a reconstruction of the original. The building retains an original ballroom at the third floor with a coved plaster ceiling.

Pittsford was the site of several early inns because of its location on the primary road between Rochester and Canandaigua and because a large stage coach company operated out of the settlement. The Phoenix Hotel was built to replace an earlier hotel which had burned. The structure's relatively large size anticipated the growth in business due to the opening of the Erie Canal. In the 1830s, railroads began to replace the canal as the primary means of passenger transportation. Pittsford's location on a busy rail line continued to provide a steady stream of hotel guests. The Phoenix, later known as the Pittsford Inn, was one of three operating hotels Pittsford retained until the first quarter of the twentieth-century when the rise of the automobile eliminated much of the need for lodging in small towns. Over the next fifty years the building served alternately as a popular restaurant and tavern.

During the 1950's, a new gasoline service station was constructed up against the main facade of the old Phoenix Hotel. As a result, residents started to become concerned about the future of the building and the village. Soon after the construction of the gas station, the building burned and remained vacant for several years.

Although in dilapidated condition, the loss of this building would have irreparably changed Pittsford. Fortunately, at a time when preservation was extremely uncommon in our area, the local newspaper publisher, Andrew Wolfe bought and painstakingly restored the building for use as the offices of his publishing company. The restoration of the Phoenix Building demonstrated that preservation offered a viable alternative to demolition and new construction. Perhaps more importantly it helped the entire community realize the potential it could accomplish through preservation.


42. Wiltsie & Crump Building
1 N. Main Street

Latitude: 43.0901074
Longitude: -77.515446

This 2-story Queen Anne brick late nineteenth-century commercial building is embellished with a rusticated Medina sandstone sills and lintels, a corbelled cornice, a gabled parapet, and the top of the cornice is embellished with pommels. The structure was built in 1886 as a general store to replace an earlier structure which had burned.


43. Wiltsie Memorial Building (Village Hall)
21 North Main Street

Latitude: 43.091906
Longitude: -77.514757

This brick 2-story hip-roof building was constructed about 1855 as an Italianate style house. The building was remodeled and donated to the Village as a community library in 1937 by Mary Emily Wiltsie Field. Mrs. Field gave the building as a memorial to her father who had grown up in the house. An outstanding example of the Colonial Revial style, the interior of the building is distinguished by cherry woodwork and opalescent glass windows. The library remained at this site until 1974 when the Town relocated it's current site on State Street. At the same time village offices were moved from the Town Hall to occupy this building. The 2001 refurbishment of the building's interior included historically appropriate lighting and colors and restoration of original finishes.


44. Sam Hutchinson House
25 N. Main Street

Latitude: 43.091868
Longitude: -77.515395

This mid-nineteenth-century 2-1/2-story wood frame vernacular house was home to Sam Hutchison, the proprietor of one of Pittsford's late-nineteenth- century canal businesses. Hutchison had the house remodeled and expanded by raising the roof and adding the Queen Anne style staggered saw-cut clapboard filling the gable end. Pittsford has retained a group of houses dating from the 1880's, which share similar gable end detailing and are believed to be the work of a single builder/carpenter. Two additional examples of this local style are located immediately across North Main Street between the Four Corners and the canal.


45. Agate-Zornow Home
27 North Main Street

Latitude: 43.092225
Longitude: -77.514763

Designed by Rochester architect, Charles Crandall, this large brick two- story hipped roof structure is the village's most sophisticated Queen Anne style house. The house features a Medina sandstone coursed foundation and carved lintels. The gable ends occurring over two-story bays are clad with beaver tail red slate. Twin entrance porches with Eastlake style spindle work face the street. Double entrance doors lead to a large entrance hall with oak stair and stepped colored glass windows. The interior retains II foot high ceilings and high quality false graining. The house is set on nearly two acres of lawns bordering the canal. A small two-story wood frame vernacular tenant house, dating from the first quarter of the nineteenth century, is located at the rear of the property. The house is operated as a bed and breakfast known as the Canal Lamp Inn.

The house was constructed in 1887 for Pittsford businessman, John Agate. Agate, with his brother Will, operated a large and successful malt business and grist mill. The malt houses were located on the west side of North Main Street along the south bank of the Erie Canal. These buildings were destroyed during the turn-of-the-century canal widening project. The Hutchison and Zornow families, who have occupied this house during most of the twentieth century, also owned canal related businesses.


46. North Main Street Cottages
31 North Main Street

Latitude: 43.093131
Longitude: -77.514727

The four small wood frame vernacular houses located immediately north of the canal on North Main Street date from the middle of the nineteenth century. The two houses located on the east side of the street retain distinctive Italianate style details including paired half-round windows and a bracketed entrance canopy. Although modest in size and simple in design, this group is significant as a remaining example of typical village housing from the mid-nineteenth-century.

Several of the homes have historic ties to the canal. The Lusk House (31 North Main Street served as a canal tavern for many years. The two houses located on the east side of North Main Street were owned by the Schoen family who operated a large produce and coal business on Schoen’s Alley.


47. Pittsford Farms
44 North Main Street

Latitude: 43.093672
Longitude: -77.514103

This National Register listed mid- nineteenth-century farm estate is both architecturally and historically significant. The large wood frame two- story gabled main house is elevated on a small knoll and is surrounded by extensive park-like grounds. Italianate in style, the house features broad overhanging eaves supported by paired scroll brackets, paired half- round windows, and tall floor-to- ceiling windows opening to an elaborated bracketed porch. Cast iron statuary, a circular drive, and a Gothic revival cast iron fence mounted on a stone retaining wall at the front the property represent the mid nineteenth-century Rural Landscape Movement. The farm retains an extensive collection of agricultural outbuildings.

The main house was originally constructed in 1814 By Samuel Hildreth, an early Pittsford merchant and the operator of a large stagecoach network that traversed western New York. Hildreth's stables were located just south of the house but were destroyed when the railroad was constructed in 1834. The present appearance of the property is due to Jarvis Lord, who purchased the farm in the 1860s. Lord, a prominent politician and entrepreneur, profited from the reconstruction of the Great Embankment during the 1850's.

In 1888 the farm was sold to Frank and Estelle Hawley. During the Hawleys' ownership the farm gained national recognition for its outstanding herds of Jersey cattle and Shetland ponies. The Hawleys also began the dairy which today is Pittsford's oldest business.

The 200 acre farm was sold to the Ted Zornow in 1946 and remains a family operation. The farmstead and dairy are owned by Zornow's son-in-law, Charles Corby. The bulk of the farmland is owned by Roger Powers, another son-in- law of Zornow. The development rights for most of Power's portion of the property have been purchased by the Town of Pittsford to assure their preservation as agricultural open space.


48. New York Central Railroad Depot
41 North Main Street

Latitude: 43.09385
Longitude: -77.515149

These fine twin structures served Pittsford until 1959 when passenger service was discontinued and this rail line became a freight spur. The hipped roof brick building served as the passenger terminal and was constructed in 1860 following New York Central’s standard terminal design. This structure retains many original elements of its beaded board interior. The gabled wood frame freight terminal was constructed at the turn-of-the- century after an earlier building collapsed during a heavy snow.

As late as the 1950s mail was drawn by hand cart from the station up the hill to the Post Office located on South Main Street. In 1963 the abandoned structures were joined by a contemporary link and converted into a restaurant. Freight rail service was entirely discontinued in the mid-1980s and the railroad tracks were removed.


49. Auburn Line
41 North Main Street

Latitude: 43.09385
Longitude: -77.515149

The Rochester & Auburn Railroad established rail service to arrive in Pittsford in 1834. The line reached Canandaigua in 1840. In 1853, it became a branch of the New York Central Railroad. Until other rail lines were established, the Auburn line served as the primary route between Rochester and New York City. Even after it was superseded by the main line between Syracuse and Rochester, it remained a very busy route with as many as 17 passenger trains a day during the 1890s. Even as late as the 1950s six passenger trains and one local freight ran every day on this route. The rail line became the primary means of shipping for village industries. Numerous rail sidings were developed through the village. Until World War II, passenger service remained one of village residents' primary means of travel.

The rail road tracks were removed in the mid-nineteen eighties. Since that time, most visible signs of this rail line have disappeared. However the historic economic importance of this line should not be overlooked. During the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the railroad provided efficient transportation for Pittsford's agriculture related industries sustaining the community's economy. As a result Pittsford enjoyed prosperity and slow steady growth, while neighboring canal communities, such as Bushnell's Basin, shrank or disappeared altogether once the initial boom from the canal was over.


50. Schoen Complex
11 Schoen Place

Latitude: 43.091386
Longitude: -77.512032

This group of former warehouses, sheds, small houses, and a coal storage silo is located at the western end of Schoen Place. These simple wood frame vernacular structures are architecturally and historically significant. The coal tower, due to its size, is one of Pittsford's important visual landmarks. The survival of the historic canal warehouse district along Schoen Place is one of the village's most unique assets.

In the mid nineteenth-century H. H. Cronk operated a lumberyard on this site. The Schoen Brothers business was begun in the last quarter of the nineteenth-century selling seed as well as farmer's and builder's supplies. The site also included an apple dry house. The dry house operations consisted of peeling, cutting, coring and drying apples to preserve them. Pittsford was an important fruit growing area in the first decades of the twentieth century and apple drying was a flourishing business. Businesses such as this, based on agriculture and dependent on the canal or railroad for transportation, were the driving force behind the village's economy in the nineteenth-century.

Early in the twentieth century the business's focus shifted toward the sales of coal. Customers included local home owners, businesses, and commercial tug operators on the canal. The coal tower was constructed in the 1920s. Coal was unloaded by conveyor from railroad cars into the silo. The coal was then fed through chutes into trucks parked below.

In the late 1960s Ted Collins bought the property to house his landscaping business. Several years later the landscaping business was moved to Mendon and Collins began renovating the buildings for use as retail shops and restaurants.


51. Port-of-Pittsford Park
22 North Main Street

Latitude: 43.091817
Longitude: -77.514516

This concrete mooring wall was constructed at the beginning of the twentieth century as part of New York State's canal widening project. Each community along the canal was provided with a port suitable for the docking of barges. Pittsford's port was most active during the 1930s and 1940s when it was used by Ted Zornow as a coaling station for canal tugboats. The Town of Pittsford created the current park during the mid-1970s.


52. Pittsford Flour Mills
11 Schoen Place

Latitude: 43.091515
Longitude: -77.511925

The flour mill and grain elevator are the most important character defining elements of Pittsford’s canal waterfront. This complex consists of a three-story wood-frame flour mill, and a 130 feet tall concrete grain elevator. The flour mill was constructed next to the canal in the mid-nineteenth century. The flour mill was expanded in the early twentieth century fir additional production area and office space.

Flour milling, one of Pittsford's primary businesses in the nineteenth century, occurred on this until the 1930s. After Grandin Vogt sold the mill to Henry Perrigo early in this century, it was expanded and became an important regional producer of flour. The capacity of the mill which had been about 20 barrels a day was increased to over 1000 barrels per day. Ted Zornow bought the complex in 1952 for use as part of his grain wholesaling business. Wheat, red kidney beans, oats and black beans from area farmers were processed, bagged, and shipped by railroad to food processors throughout the eastern United States. This business continued to operate until 1997.


53. T. J. Zornow Inc.
15 Schoen Place

Latitude: 43.091621
Longitude: -77.511946

This complex consists of five individual structures. The first two structures constructed on the site were the one-story stucco hipped roof office with truck scales and the large two- story flat-roofed bean warehouse located immediately behind. To the west are a one-story wood-frame truck shed and wood-frame steel-sided grain storage building. At the east end of the site is a nineteenth-century two- story wood frame mill moved from Geneseo in 1942. These buildings have an extremely high level of integrity and are an outstanding example of an early twentieth century rural agribusiness complex. Similar structures are rapidly disappearing from communities across New York State, so preservation of these structures through adaptive reuse should be a high priority.


54. Plumb's Lane Cottage
34 State Street

Latitude: 43.090254
Longitude: -77.512777

These two small vernacular houses, located on the south bank of the canal, were moved to their current site during the first quarter of the twentieth- century. The larger two-and-one-half- story house was moved from North Main Street to allow for expansion of the canal in 1910. Prior to the canal enlargement, Plumb's lane was a pleasant tree shaded dirt lane running along the south bank of the canal between North Main Street and State Street. The smaller one and one-half- story house was moved in 1925 from State Street to make room for a gas station. Both structures are good examples of late nineteenth-century modest village housing.


55. Big Spring
21 Schoen Place

Latitude: 43.091386
Longitude: -77.511839

A natural spring is located in the canal bed near the south bank opposite Newcomb Oil. During the winter, the location of the spring is easily identified by presence of open water, usually crowded with wild ducks. The spring, which was known and used by native Americans, attracted the village's first settler, Israel Stone, who built a log cabin at the site in 1789.

The pond was the source of a small creek which flows through Pittsford Farms on its way to Irondequoit Creek. In 1909 when the canal was widened, the spring was incorporated into the canal. At the insistence of the Hawley family, who used the creek to supply water for pastured livestock, New York State constructed a culvert running from the south bank of the canal to the north side of the railroad bed. Today, this creek feeds several irrigation ponds used by the Powers' farming operation.


56. Pittsford Lumberyard
50 State Street

Latitude: 43.08999
Longitude: -77.510573

Founded as Wadhams & Whitlock Lumber Dealers, this business was originally located south of State Street between Boughton Avenue and the canal. The canal widening of 1911 forced the business to relocate to the east end of Schoen Place. The lumberyard continued to operate until 1972 when a fire destroyed the larger lumber sheds and inventory. Over the following ten years, owner John Mason renovated the remaining buildings and constructed several new buildings to create the Northfield Commons retail area.


57. Burdett Building
17-21 South Main Street

Latitude: 43.090342
Longitude: -77.515755

This 2½-story side-gable commercial building was built in 1814 as a tavern and store by Samuel Hildreth. Hildreth also built the house at 44 North Main and, before being remodeled, the two structures looked very similar (See 29 Pittsford farms). The front gable with loft hoist was added about 1870. At that time the building was used as the home and general store of the Bacon family. Before the present Town hall was built in 1890, Town officials met in the ballroom on the second floor. During much of the twentieth century, the building has been owned by the Burdett family who operated a grocery store for many years.


58. Utz Home
34 Church Street

Latitude: 43.089349
Longitude: -77.51351

This 2½-story front-gable Federal house was built about 1820. Although now clad with circa 1920 wood shingles, the delicate cornice returns, proportions and fenestration pattern are clear evidence of the Federal style. This house is part of a group of several very early houses located along Church Street.


59. Linnean House
15 State Street

Latitude: 43.090339
Longitude: -77.514057

Restored in the early 1970's, this 2½-story front-gable house features delicate cornice returns and a fine federal entrance surround. The house is typical of Federal period residential construction in western New York.


60. Schoen House
32 North Main Street

Latitude: 43.092918
Longitude: -77.514382

Built in the 1860's, a modest house of "Italian Style" as evidenced by the bracketed canopy and double-arched sash in the attic gable. Good entrance of the period.


61. Carousel Shop
36 North Main Street

Latitude: 43.093132
Longitude: -77.514285

This Italianate house was built by Hiram H. Cronkhite in 1872. The Porch was added about 1900. Cronkhite operated a lumberyard on the land behind the house until 1893 when the property was sold to John Schoen. Schoen ran a produce wholesale business in the barns behind the house, located along the east end "Schoen's Alley" now known as Schoen Place. The small one-story wing, located close to the entrance to Schoen Place was the office for the business. The hump still visible in the street at that location is remant of a scales weighing trucks and wagons loaded with produce. In the twentieth century, Schoen began selling larger amounts of coal. To accommodate the growing business, Schoen constructed the silo now containing the Coal Tower Restaurant. The business survived until 1966 when the house and barns were sold and then remodeled into retail shops and restaurants by Ted Collins and others.


62. The Depot
41-43 North Main Street

Latitude: 43.093668
Longitude: -77.514371

A notable project of preservation through imaginative adaptation. Well known for Pittsford's later nineteenth century buildings, two railroad buildings were built in 1860-1863 by the N.Y. Central Railroad.


63. Burdett Building
19 South Main Street

Latitude: 43.090595
Longitude: -77516.409

This 2½-story side-gable commercial building was built in 1814 as a tavern and store by Samuel Hildreth. Hildreth also built the house at 44 North Main and, before being remodeled, the two structures looked very similar (See 29 Pittsford farms). The front gable with loft hoist was added about 1870. At that time the building was used as the home and general store of the Bacon family. Before the present Town hall was built in 1890, Town officials met in the ballroom on the second floor. During much of the twentieth century, the building has been owned by the Burdett family who operated a grocery store for many years.


64. Utz Home
35 Church Street

Latitude: 43.090595
Longitude: -77.516409

This 2½-story front-gable Federal house was built about 1820. Although now clad with circa 1920 wood shingles, the delicate cornice returns, proportions and fenestration pattern are clear evidence of the Federal style. This house is part of a group of several very early houses located along Church Street.


65. Linnean House
15 State Street

Latitude: 43.09003
Longitude: -77.516409

Restored in the early 1970's, this 2½- story front-gable house features delicate cornice returns and a fine federal entrance surround. The house is typical of Federal period residential construction in western New York


66. Schoen House
32 North Main Street

Latitude: 43.092581
Longitude: -77.51384

Built in the 1860's, a modest house of "Italian Style" as evidenced by the bracketed canopy and double-arched sash in the attic gable. Good entrance of the period.


End of Tour